undefinedStairs and atrium
Stairs and atrium. Photo copyright Pam Carmichael Photography

Mayor Lianne Dalziel, opening the new library, said that the $92 million five-level centre on the edge of Cathedral Square marks the return of Christchurch’s cultural and community heart following the 2011 earthquake.

"Tūranga will create a new set of memories for a new generation in a way I would never have dreamed as a child. It is much more than a library and I think it’s going to transform the central city. It’s a massive game changer in terms of giving people of all ages an inspirational place to meet, learn, create and discover. It is jam packed with new experiences, technology and knowledge and I hope it will excite children into dreaming about their future and the part they can play in shaping our city and our world."

As well as housing more than 180,000 items, Tūranga holds a suite of technology features including New Zealand’s largest digital touch-screen, the Discovery Wall, on the ground floor which allows users to swipe through a virtual world of photos, videos and information.

There is also a music studio, video editing suite, 3D printing, robotics, exhibition spaces, a conference room, café, community arena, youth space and a children's play area.

undefinedYouth space
Youth space. Photo copyright Pam Carmichael Photography

Tūranga, the largest and most modern library in the South Island, is expected to attract more than 3,000 people each day.

Christchurch’s former central library was demolished after being damaged in the February 2011 earthquake. It was the largest and busiest library in the South Island with nearly one million visitors each year. Its replacement was designed by New Zealand company Architectus in association with Danish library design experts schmidt hammer lassen.